Musée International
de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge

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Maria Eskens par Marie Leyder


Description

“Take care” is a deceptively simple phrase that evokes the principle of humanity and underpins all humanitarian action. In WHO CARES? GENDER AND HUMANITARIAN ACTION, the Museum’s latest exhibition, a question that is often intended derisively is instead an earnest enquiry into who tends to people’s wounds and works to meet their needs. Who actually cares, in every sense of the word?

WHO CARES?, produced in partnership with the Institute for Ethics, History and the Humanities at the University of Geneva, invites visitors to consider humanitarian action through the lens of gender and diversity. The exhibition offers a fresh look at the experience of people who have been largely overlooked by history and encourages visitors to re-examine their own perceptions of humanitarian workers and of those who receive care, through a broad selection of objects and accounts that have been assembled and presented together for the first time.

Marie Leyder is a researcher at the Institute of Ethics, History and Humanities of the University of Geneva and curator of the exhibition WHO CARES? GENDER AND HUMANITARIAN ACTION.


Crédits

© Rosy Lobster Pictures. Musée international de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge.


Tags

VidéosFocusGenre et diversité

Contenus liés

Maria Eskens par Marie Leyder


Description

“Take care” is a deceptively simple phrase that evokes the principle of humanity and underpins all humanitarian action. In WHO CARES? GENDER AND HUMANITARIAN ACTION, the Museum’s latest exhibition, a question that is often intended derisively is instead an earnest enquiry into who tends to people’s wounds and works to meet their needs. Who actually cares, in every sense of the word?

WHO CARES?, produced in partnership with the Institute for Ethics, History and the Humanities at the University of Geneva, invites visitors to consider humanitarian action through the lens of gender and diversity. The exhibition offers a fresh look at the experience of people who have been largely overlooked by history and encourages visitors to re-examine their own perceptions of humanitarian workers and of those who receive care, through a broad selection of objects and accounts that have been assembled and presented together for the first time.

Marie Leyder is a researcher at the Institute of Ethics, History and Humanities of the University of Geneva and curator of the exhibition WHO CARES? GENDER AND HUMANITARIAN ACTION.


Crédits

© Rosy Lobster Pictures. Musée international de la Croix-Rouge et du Croissant-Rouge.


Tags

VidéosFocusGenre et diversité

Contenus liés